Subject matter. Are there specific topics people gravitate towards? Look at the open rate on your emails to see if there are any surprises. In some industries, people are always asking about a specific topic, but the open rate for emails addressing it is low. Sometimes people think they’re interested (or not interested) in reading information about certain topics, but the data shows otherwise. Keep an eye on which types of emails are read most often, and which aren’t, so you can modify the subjects you cover appropriately. Your readers may even change their interests and preferences over time.
Before you send out your first marketing message, you need a list of people to send your emails to. Only send your email marketing messages to people who voluntarily sign up to receive them or you might develop a reputation as a spammer -- someone who sends unsolicited and unwanted email. Create a place on your website for people to sign up for communication from you. If you sell products online, include in the checkout process a way for customers to opt in to future emails from your company. Make sure all of your communications include a link that people can click on to unsubscribe from your marketing.
Create different email lists. Keep email addresses organized in spreadsheets and make sure you separate them. At minimum, you should have the emails broken into lists of current customers, past customers and prospective customers. Creating separate email lists allows you to send different emails to the groups, each with their own targeted content. As you go along, you can get more specific with your lists for even better targeting.

Another common mistake is to only send sales pitches to your readers.  “There’s more to sending out an email than putting some pictures of your product and saying, ‘okay, go buy it,’ because people won’t keep looking at the email if you don’t spend a little bit of time writing it,” says Bastian. Instead, post highly valuable content your readers are interested in and which they would benefit from, whether they use your product or not. Things like how-tos, tips and product help are popular types of content.[/two_third]
Build your email list.[1] The three most important groups to market to via email are your current customers, past customers, and prospective customers. Use a spreadsheet to create a database of their names and email addresses. If you don’t already have the email addresses, you’ll need to start collecting them. To build your list, use your website, storefront, front desk, and every phone call to request your visitor's email address.[2]
Don’t assume that affiliate marketing is.. well, just emailing a couple of advertisements. It can open doors of opportunities between you and your audience. Create captivating and interesting emails, not only to draw your current audience in but to make it irresistible for them not to forward to their family and friends as well. Great examples like hosting a refer-a-friend promotion, life hacks and tips and tricks, product comparisons in the current market. These are wonderful ways to attract new potential readers, luring them in and increasing your email list!

Newsletters have historically been emails that humble-brag about internal company achievements and give generic information to the poor saps that were unfortunate enough to end up on said company's RSS feed (whatever that is, or rather, was). So while the old “newsletter” content is useless and dead,  successful marketers know that quality email marketing is still one of the best marketing tools available, especially for service-based businesses. Depending on which study you read, you get $35 to $40 back for every dollar you invest in email! This reinforces the fact that, hands down, there's nothing more valuable than direct access to someone’s attention.
This truly intuitive dashboard doesn’t just tell you about open rates, click rates and other basics. GetResponse has created a customizable experience where you decide what you need to see. You can compare the effectiveness of one email against another, watch a map that shows your subscribers receiving and opening your emails in real-time or check for weak points in your autoresponders.
Many marketers have been seduced by social media advertising, perceiving it to be not only “cooler,” but also more effective than email marketing. There’s no denying that social media gets a lot more media attention than email marketing. However, claims that email marketing is no longer effective are simply not true (check out these email marketing stats that prove it). Any marketer worth their salt will tell you that email remains a cornerstone of their campaigns.
Take the email below from Paperless Post, for example. I love the header of this email: It provides a clear CTA that includes a sense of urgency. Then, the subheader asks a question that forces recipients to think to themselves, "Wait, when is Mother's Day again? Did I buy Mom a card?" Below this copy, the simple grid design is both easy to scan and quite visually appealing. Each card picture is a CTA in and of itself -- click on any one of them, and you'll be taken to a purchase page.
Why does email list segmentation matter? We know that beyond relevancy, list segmentation is important from a revenue perspective. Data from the DMA indicates that segmented and targeted emails generate 58% of all email revenue. On top of this, our research found that marketers who used segmented campaigns noted as much as a 76% increase in revenue–and more than 76% of marketers say basic segmentation is part of their email marketing strategy.
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