When I look back at my first batch of emails, I cringe; they were terrible. Accept that yours will be, too. A link will be broken, you’ll have a typo or typos (and everybody will email to point out your idiotic spelling mistake) or you will reread what you’ve written later and feel differently. The list of growing pain blunders goes on. It’s best to experience and move through some of those stresses and mistakes at the beginning when you don't have a huge audience yet. At first, you’ll be mortified. But it’s also not as bad as you think because the stakes are still low.

Test. Different email clients and mobile devices display emails differently. Send test emails to colleagues, or use a testing program to make sure your emails are going to look good on screens big and small. Testing reveals design mistakes before it's too late, and testing programs can predict whether or not a campaign will get caught in a spam filter. You could even set up accounts with a few different email services for easy testing. Avoid sending one big image as a campaign, and cover your bases with a plain-text option for every email.
As you can see from the example above, emails following the model contain a succinct headline that highlights the key message of the campaign, as well as supporting information and visuals to help convince readers about the benefits of clicking-through. The reader is then presented with a prominent call to action button that makes it crystal clear what to do next.
Social media may be the young whippersnapper nipping at email’s heels, but the content king of the inbox still holds sway in social influence, according to a study by SocialTwist. Over an 18-month period, SocialTwist monitored 119 referral campaigns from leading brands and companies. The results showed a significant advantage to email’s ability to convert new customers compared to Facebook and Twitter.
If you’re wondering why ecommerce entrepreneurs choose to incorporate email into their marketing campaigns, consider this. The ROI you can gain through email marketing is huge. For every $1 spent on email marketing, businesses obtain a return of ~ $44. So far in 2017, the median ROI for email marketing is 122%, which is four times higher than other common marketing channels including social media and adwords. This is largely because once someone gives you their email address, they have already self-selected based on their interest in your products and your brand. Therefore, it’s a wise decision to start implementing email marketing into your business plan if you haven’t done so already.
Finding products and services to promote as an affiliate is an incredibly straightforward process. There are several large advertising networks that focus exclusively on creating affiliate relationships between advertisers and publishers. These affiliate networks will handle any necessary paperwork, provide banners and other creative to use on your website, serve as an intermediary in the relationship and make sure that you get paid for your efforts.
This is why, as an entrepreneur, I believe that building successful email marketing campaigns has never been more important than it is now. But there’s a problem; most people don’t know how to do it right. So in the interest of furthering best practices and helping you succeed as a business owner, let’s get back to the basics and talk about how a great email campaign is built, from the ground up.
Even if you’ve already got a long list of emails for clients and prospects, you should never stop adding to it. Especially since it’s not nearly as hard as it sounds. For example, make sure your list is always growing passively with a signup feature on your website. Subscription forms should be on your home page, blog page and everywhere else you can fit it without taking away from more important content.
Maybe there is someone out there that still likes getting monthly or weekly emails in their inbox with subject lines like “August newsletter: update of company events at blah blah Inc.” However, for most of us the word “newsletter” has become unattractive; devoid of meaning and therefore any value. We don't like the newsletters we receive nor do we get anything out of them so we resist creating our own email marketing campaigns in fear of being that meaningless content dribbling into others inboxes that we dislike so much ourselves.
Now that you know who you’re writing to, it’s time to think about your content. What do you want to say to your audience? You’ll want to send emails with purpose, that really speak to your subscribers, so always keep in mind what they signed up for. It might be helpful to outline some general content types you can include in your campaigns, so you can refer to it when designing your emails.
If you’ve been following along from the beginning, you have now learned how to grow your email list to epic proportions, you’ve segmented your list so that your emails are highly relevant to each individual subscriber, and you’ve learned how to send amazingly effective emails that have a high open-rate. Now you are ready to automate the process and turn your campaigns into money-making machines!
We suggest sending an email at least once a month to keep your subscribers engaged, but don’t feel you need to commit to this immediately. And be sure to look ahead and plan accordingly if you think your sending frequency will change for special events and holidays—you don’t want to surprise customers if you typically send once a month but suddenly start sending a stream of emails leading up to a Black Friday sales event.
A call to action (also referred to as a CTA) is a great way to collect new email addresses.  Calls to action provide opt-in opportunities for your website visitors.  Some examples of these opt-ins are coupons, discounts, newsletters, or something else that will appeal to your target audience. To get the offer, the visitor submits their email address.  Now you have new leads to add to your email marketing campaigns.  It’s that easy.
Presentation is everything, or so they say. With this old adage in mind, we’ve compiled our best tips for anyone who wants to send emails that subscribers click into a handy email design guide. We cover each facet of design: content, templates, identity, color, images, layout, fonts, and calls to action. Design is as much science as it is art, and we take the guesswork out of what can seem like the most challenging part of sending good emails.
Be friendly. Feel free to use a casual tone in your email newsletters. Since most emails come directly from one person, people expect human voices in their inboxes. There's a good chance your subscribers are already in a informal frame of mind when they're checking their email, so an overly formal or stodgy voice might seem out of place. Plus, they've given you their email address, so you're already on a first-name basis. If you collect first names on your signup form, you can dynamically include them in your email greetings.
We just started using MailChimp because it seems to be the only one that offers a free account for small or new users. The problem is that there are so many steps for a potential subscriber to go through with both double opt-in and recaptcha, that we are getting at best complaints to worst, plain nasty comments posted on our Facebook page. We don’t know how many would be subscribers we lost because of this.
Even if you’re leveraging the marketing efforts of others rather than doing the outreach part yourself initially, you can use those efforts to build a critical asset — an email list of buyers. Once you’ve got that list, optimize your back end with customer behavior data and a multitude of different offers and you can maximize the customer lifetime value of those list members.
This is your first step and for many campaigns, it may be the most important step of all. This is where you define your visual style and merge it with your logo and your brand. If you are already in marketing, I assume that the logo was already created and you also have a business website and maybe a few social media accounts where it can be promoted.
“We sent some newsletters where we gave customers a choice of which special they wanted,” said PJ. “Either a 20% discount or free shipping. What we discovered was that some people always choose the discount, and some always choose the shipping—it’s not necessarily which special saves them more money. So we took that information and now we alternate our specials.”
Why should your email campaign recipients be interested in opening your emails?  They’ll be interested if you offer something that they value.  Perhaps you can offer a discount on a product or service.  Or maybe you want to offer informative content to encourage website visits.  Whatever you offer, it needs to be relevant and valuable to your target audience
“We sent some newsletters where we gave customers a choice of which special they wanted,” said PJ. “Either a 20% discount or free shipping. What we discovered was that some people always choose the discount, and some always choose the shipping—it’s not necessarily which special saves them more money. So we took that information and now we alternate our specials.”
Even though you’re creating beautiful and engaging email campaigns, some recipients may still want to unsubscribe—the inbox is a noisy place! Although setting up an unsubscribe group or option might be considered a minor step, failing to ensure a way for your recipients to unsubscribe from your email marketing campaigns can cause disastrous consequences for deliverability and your sender reputation if you ignore them.
This is why, as an entrepreneur, I believe that building successful email marketing campaigns has never been more important than it is now. But there’s a problem; most people don’t know how to do it right. So in the interest of furthering best practices and helping you succeed as a business owner, let’s get back to the basics and talk about how a great email campaign is built, from the ground up.
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