Make Content an Afterthought: When you’re executing an email campaign, it’s common (and a best practice) to dedicate a lot of your focus on planning your campaign, segmenting your list and building out the emails. Very often, particularly in nurture campaigns and newsletters, content is a critical component of your emails. As a result, you also need to pay attention to the content that you’ll share in these emails. Strategically mapping your content to your email marketing efforts (and even aligning content creation with campaign planning efforts) is critical to your overall success. If your content is simply an afterthought, it shows.
Create different email lists. Keep email addresses organized in spreadsheets and make sure you separate them. At minimum, you should have the emails broken into lists of current customers, past customers and prospective customers. Creating separate email lists allows you to send different emails to the groups, each with their own targeted content. As you go along, you can get more specific with your lists for even better targeting.
Subject line. What does better for you, emails with lots of information in the subject line or those with just a bit? If you have 200 addresses or more on your email list, A/B split testing can help you analyze two different subject lines for the exact same post to see which one gets a better response. There may be specific subject lines for your list that you’d like to test as well.
To target your current and potential customers, the oldest method is Email Marketing- And hands down, it is the most useful and contemporary one as well.  We all know that we can never ignore an email, does not matter how much we want to ignore it. We ought to open it so we do not see it as notification. Even in some cases, we do not read email but look at the brand names. Which means, anyhow mails are going to be read, the only thing you need to do is make your mail convincing enough to ensure conversions- And this Email Marketing Tutorial will guide you do that skillfully.
Unsubscribe rate. Unsubscribes are always going to happen no matter what, and that’s usually OK because those people probably would never have bought from you anyway. However, a high unsubscribe rate can indicate that you are losing potential customers. Check the following: Why did people subscribe to your list in the first place, and are you delivering on that promise? Is the content of your autoresponder highly relevant to the segment it is being sent to? Are you sending too many sales emails with too little value emails?

Think about mobile. If a campaign doesn't show up on mobile devices, it's not going to perform very well. Everything you send should be mobile-friendly. Check out ReturnPath's "Email in Motion" infographic for some data that might affect the way you design your emails. One of the highlights: According to the study, 63 percent of Americans and 41 percent of Europeans would either close or delete an email that's not optimized for mobile. Might be time to start using a responsive template.
Now that you know who you’re writing to, it’s time to think about your content. What do you want to say to your audience? You’ll want to send emails with purpose, that really speak to your subscribers, so always keep in mind what they signed up for. It might be helpful to outline some general content types you can include in your campaigns, so you can refer to it when designing your emails.
Fortunately for beginners just getting started with affiliate marketing, hard sales skills – though great to have – are not a prerequisite for affiliate marketing success. Provided that you choose a profitable niche market, set up your WordPress platform properly, and take the right steps to grow your audience, you can generate affiliate income as a relationship marketer. As mentioned earlier, if you do it right promoting the right products that can help your audience is a way to actually add value.
While almost all reputable email service providers work very hard to make sure that your emails are not blocked by major ISP’s, they can’t control whether or not your emails hit the inbox or the spam box. Although most will help you by providing a quality score to help you determine availability, getting whitelisted is the most effective way to ensure that your emails get delivered properly.
Lots of people will shop online, add items to their shopping cart, and then abandon the shopping process before completing their purchase. If you send out an automated email reminding people about the items left behind in their cart, you increase the likelihood that they will return to complete their purchase. In some cases, you can use the automated email to encourage consumers to ask questions that may have prevented them from completing the initial purchase.
Talk of the South is also a source of revenue for Garden & Gun. As you can see in the screenshot above, the newsletter features advertising, just as the print and online editions of the magazine do. However, the ads aren’t intrusive and are highly targeted and relevant to Garden & Gun’s readership. I’d be very interested to see the CTR data of these ads, as I suspect it would be high in comparison to traditional website banners.
Use it to promote up-sells/cross-sells. You can even set up an autoresponder sequence for someone after they purchase and get repeat customers. Depending on the products you sell, you could offer an upsell, or cross sell related products. For example, if someone buys a digital camera, you can offer to add a lens, a tripod, and other accessories to their order before it ships. Or, if you sell products that people buy frequently (like food or disposable items, like diapers), you can automatically send them offers for new items when you know they’re about due for another order.

A call to action (also referred to as a CTA) is a great way to collect new email addresses.  Calls to action provide opt-in opportunities for your website visitors.  Some examples of these opt-ins are coupons, discounts, newsletters, or something else that will appeal to your target audience. To get the offer, the visitor submits their email address.  Now you have new leads to add to your email marketing campaigns.  It’s that easy.
Use it as a lead magnet/free mini course. You can also use an autoresponder as a lead magnet to attract new subscribers to your email list. This is commonly done in the form of a free “mini course”, or a free “challenge”, which promises to deliver a series of emails containing lessons (or other valuable information) over the course of several days or weeks. There is a high perceived value with a mini course or a challenge like this, which makes it a very effective lead magnet.
Why should your email campaign recipients be interested in opening your emails?  They’ll be interested if you offer something that they value.  Perhaps you can offer a discount on a product or service.  Or maybe you want to offer informative content to encourage website visits.  Whatever you offer, it needs to be relevant and valuable to your target audience
If you’ve been following along from the beginning, you have now learned how to grow your email list to epic proportions, you’ve segmented your list so that your emails are highly relevant to each individual subscriber, and you’ve learned how to send amazingly effective emails that have a high open-rate. Now you are ready to automate the process and turn your campaigns into money-making machines!
Make Content an Afterthought: When you’re executing an email campaign, it’s common (and a best practice) to dedicate a lot of your focus on planning your campaign, segmenting your list and building out the emails. Very often, particularly in nurture campaigns and newsletters, content is a critical component of your emails. As a result, you also need to pay attention to the content that you’ll share in these emails. Strategically mapping your content to your email marketing efforts (and even aligning content creation with campaign planning efforts) is critical to your overall success. If your content is simply an afterthought, it shows.
While it may seem quick and easy to purchase a list of email addresses, it will hurt you way more than it will help. For one thing, you’ll see a huge number of people unsubscribing from the very beginning. Wouldn’t you rather measure who’s saying yes than who’s saying no? Purchasing a list will also reflect poorly on your brand and the credibility of your company.
Only send email if you have something to say. This one seems obvious, but too many companies start email newsletters with no plan and nothing to say. Email is simply a way to publish content—the content itself has to come first. Before starting a newsletter, make sure it's a sustainable commitment that will help you achieve your business goals. Otherwise, you'll be wasting your subscribers' time and your own time. Ask yourself: What's the goal for this kind of communication? What do we have to say? How will we measure success? Send thoughtful newsletters, and keep the focus on your company's message.

For example, if you see that the majority of your signups are being generated from forms you’ve shared on Facebook and Twitter, then you might want to focus on connecting with your customers—and potential customers—through social media. You can even create segments to target people who joined your list through a specific method, whether it’s an integration like Facebook, an app like Mailchimp Subscribe, an e-commerce integration, or a hosted form. And if there’s a specific page on your website you want to track signups from, you can add a hidden field to your embedded form and place it on multiple pages.
Not only was this initial email great, but his response to my answers was even better: Within a few days of responding to the questionnaire, I received a long and detailed personal email from Matt thanking me for filling out the questionnaire and offering a ton of helpful advice and links to resources specifically catered to my answers. I was very impressed by his business acumen, communication skills, and obvious dedication to his readers.
At some point in your email campaigns, even if they once opted into your emails, some recipients may not want to hear from you anymore. That’s ok (and a natural part of the email lifecycle), as long as you have a solid unsubscribe system in place for these users. The ability to unsubscribe from your email program should never be challenging and should be available in one click.
A (potential) customer has subscribed, now what? The first follow-up email the (potential) customer receives after signing up is crucial to the success of your email marketing campaign. Using the email service provider you have selected (i.e. MailChimp, Constant Contact, GetResponse etc.), employ the autoresponder sequence for this immediate follow-up email. This email should include an introduction to the company, as well as specify what you plan on doing with your new subscriber’s email address. For more specific directions, look over Mailify’s infographic outlining the 10 ingredients you need to craft the perfect newsletter.
"Why aren't millennials moving?" The subject line of this email campaign reads before citing interesting data about relocation trends in the U.S. Trulia doesn't benefit from people who choose not to move, but the company does benefit from having its fingers on the pulse of the industry -- and showing it cares which way the real estate winds are blowing.
We just started using MailChimp because it seems to be the only one that offers a free account for small or new users. The problem is that there are so many steps for a potential subscriber to go through with both double opt-in and recaptcha, that we are getting at best complaints to worst, plain nasty comments posted on our Facebook page. We don’t know how many would be subscribers we lost because of this.
You’ll want your messages to be easy to read, no matter what device your readers are on, or how much time they have. Using bullets and subheadings makes your email easy to scan, even, for example, if someone’s quickly checking messages on their phone while taking the subway to work. Also, make sure to break up longer paragraphs into shorter ones to make your material more digestible.
Click through rates. Once your subscribers have opened your email, are they actually taking the action you need them to take? If you think that you have a low click through rate, perhaps your body copy is not as effective as it needs to be. Consider the following: Is the copy of your email relevant to the subject line? Did you offer real value to your subscribers in the email? Is your call-to-action clear enough? Is the link easy to find?
Send a welcome email or series of emails to new subscribers.These emails earn 9x more money than promotional newsletters, and they turn your subscribers into customers. At this point, 74.4% of customers actually claim they expect to receive a welcome email. Don’t let them down. In this email, show your appreciation for their interest in your store, and offer a discount for their first purchase. See here for more welcome email ideas.
Tell subscribers what to expect. Whether you plan to send company updates, letters from the president, e-commerce sales, daily deals, or weekly tips, it's important to tell your readers what to expect and how often to expect it. Give them as much information as possible on your signup form, so they can decide whether they want to be on the list or not.
These metrics will give you a high-level view of how your emails are reaching customers and how they are receiving different emails. And don’t be afraid to take a few chances! Especially as you’re building your email marketing strategy, try new things and if they don’t work just move on to the next idea. You never know what will hit your readers and make them want to get engaged further!
Get into the mind of your customers and ask yourself: What do they want to receive in their inbox? What will they get in return for giving you their email address? What is your call to action? Make sure you communicate “what’s in it for them;” be as specific as possible, so your customers know what they are signing up for. You do not want them to be disappointed once the emails start coming in. In other words, consider the value you are providing. For example:
Email truth: people who opted in to receive your email two years, two months, or even two weeks ago, may not be interested in receiving your email anymore. Monitor your engagement metrics on a regular basis and remove unengaged users to help maintain good deliverability. (Hint: Check out R for re-engagement campaigns—they are one of the most effective tools to use to keep your list clean).
Promote your email sign-up on your website, blog, landing pages, “thank you” pages (after users have filled out a form), as well as at any live events. Most importantly, communicate what they are signing up for when they submit their email address. Building your subscriber lists the right way will ensure that email engagement remains high and your emails get in front of the eyes that matter.
When deciding the frequency of the emails you send, consider the following questions. How many promotional newsletters would be best to send to your customers per month? Are you going to send new collections or announcements about sales only? Which other types of emails would it make sense to send your customers? Do you want to do a single welcome email or a series of them? What about cart recovery and reactivation emails? Plan the entire chain of email communication with a given customer, and remember to explore the email marketing tools that your service provider has for setting up the frequency with which a customer receives emails from you.
We also love how consistent the design of Uber's emails is with its brand. Like its app, website, social media photos, and other parts of the visual branding, the emails are represented by bright colors and geometric patterns. All of its communications and marketing assets tell the brand's story -- and brand consistency is one tactic Uber's nailed in order to gain brand loyalty.
Track the effectiveness through analytics. Most email service providers include free analytics when you use their programs. These analytics provide a great deal of information about the email’s effectiveness, but the three most important metrics are the open rate, click through rate (CTR), and unsubscribes. Knowing this information can help you tweak your content for more successful email marketing in the future.
Now that you know who you’re writing to, it’s time to think about your content. What do you want to say to your audience? You’ll want to send emails with purpose, that really speak to your subscribers, so always keep in mind what they signed up for. It might be helpful to outline some general content types you can include in your campaigns, so you can refer to it when designing your emails.
Send a welcome email and provide an opt-in option.[14] Before you start marketing to someone new, you should first send a welcome email. Introduce the company and let them know what to expect from future emails. Provide an opt-in form that allows them to confirm that they want to receive further emails from you. To give them incentive to opt-in, provide an attractive offer in the welcome email.[15]
These metrics give you a high-level overview of how your subscribers are interacting with your campaigns and allow you to compare the success of one campaign to another. If you want to go deeper and see the exact people who opened and clicked your campaign, what links they clicked, etc. you can do so by choosing some of the other reports from the right hand side menu.
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