Get familiar with the law – Laws on emailing people vary from one country to another so make sure that you are familiar with the legislation that governs electronic messages. For example, the CAN-SPAM act introduced in the US in 2003 dictates how businesses should follow certain protocols when sending emails to avoid prosecution. The FTC provides a good explanation of what it means for commercial email marketers, such as affiliates.

Of course, the site’s commitment to quality content was a major factor. In fact, I actually signed up for the DIY Natural newsletter as I was researching this article. My wife and I share similar views on self-reliance and sustainability as Matt and Betsy, and we already make our own laundry detergent and other household items (including ghee). As such, DIY Natural’s content is perfect for us, and exactly the type of content I’d like to see in my inbox every week.
We also love how consistent the design of Uber's emails is with its brand. Like its app, website, social media photos, and other parts of the visual branding, the emails are represented by bright colors and geometric patterns. All of its communications and marketing assets tell the brand's story -- and brand consistency is one tactic Uber's nailed in order to gain brand loyalty.
While it may seem quick and easy to purchase a list of email addresses, it will hurt you way more than it will help. For one thing, you’ll see a huge number of people unsubscribing from the very beginning. Wouldn’t you rather measure who’s saying yes than who’s saying no? Purchasing a list will also reflect poorly on your brand and the credibility of your company.

Regarding spam, if your contact list consists of people who have subscribed to your newsletter, there’s nothing you need to worry about. Your subscribers have confirmed that they want to receive your emails, and that’s definitely not spam. If they do not want to receive your emails anymore, they can always unsubscribe. Email services make managing email lists much easier than attempting to do so on your own.


People who subscribe to your list are so interested in what you have to say that they’re willing to invite you into their inbox. This is a privilege. Honor it by letting them be the first to know about new products and sales. Or, go one step further like the company Oui Shave that asks its best customers to participate in product surveys and rewards them by making them beta testers for new products.
Lots of people will shop online, add items to their shopping cart, and then abandon the shopping process before completing their purchase. If you send out an automated email reminding people about the items left behind in their cart, you increase the likelihood that they will return to complete their purchase. In some cases, you can use the automated email to encourage consumers to ask questions that may have prevented them from completing the initial purchase.
These can be your current customers, event attendees or even that random stack of business cards you’ve collected over the years. Once you have permission (because, yes, you ALWAYS ask permission!), you’ll have a nice list of people who are already familiar with you and are just waiting to be cultivated through your awesome email marketing campaigns!
Only send email if you have something to say. This one seems obvious, but too many companies start email newsletters with no plan and nothing to say. Email is simply a way to publish content—the content itself has to come first. Before starting a newsletter, make sure it's a sustainable commitment that will help you achieve your business goals. Otherwise, you'll be wasting your subscribers' time and your own time. Ask yourself: What's the goal for this kind of communication? What do we have to say? How will we measure success? Send thoughtful newsletters, and keep the focus on your company's message.

First of all, BuzzFeed has awesome subject lines and preview text. They are always short and punchy -- which fits in perfectly with the rest of BuzzFeed's content. I especially love how the preview text will accompany the subject line. For example, if the subject line is a question, the preview text is the answer. Or if the subject line is a command (like the one below), the preview text seems like the next logical thought right after it:
Again, “newsletters” are annoying to all of us. Who wants to read your “Memorial Day Newsletter”? (Even your mom is only glancing at it and that’s just to be polite because she loves you). However, emails with your voice, philosophy and insights that the recipient actually appreciates and is interested in? That’s an entirely different beast. That is what we are going for here. RIP newsletters, hello email marketing.

It is a email marketing best practice to include information along with your sign-up form to let your new subscribers know exactly how often you plan on emailing them (whether it’s once a month or twice a week, or another timeframe), and what type of information you’ll be sending. That way, people know right away what they’re signing up for when they sign up, and expectations are set, so there aren’t any surprises.
To summarize some of the key points from this article, remember to put some extra thought into your CTA buttons and subject lines. Be sure not to clutter the email with too much text, and be strategic about the frequency with which you appear in your customers’ inboxes. Using an email service provider like MadMimi or MailChimp will help you keep all this stuff straight whilst also providing you with some great templates for busting out killer email campaigns. What’s more, is that they will help to synthesize data about how well your campaigns are performing. Take special note of things like open, click, bounce, and unsubscribe rates when trying to make sense of a campaign’s performance.
Promise privacy.[3] Many people will be reluctant to sign up for an email list unless you assure them you will keep their email addresses and personal information private. This should be promised upfront. Along with the initial promise, you should develop a privacy statement that will be included at the bottom of every email you send out. This statement should be brief and to the point.
With the continuing rise of social media clutter, email marketing campaigns are becoming even more integral to any marketing strategy, no matter how big or small your company. Marketing Land reports that 77 percent of consumers prefer to receive permission-based emails rather than any other form of marketing communication. Email marketing campaigns provide the perfect opportunity to communicate your brand image, build relationships with (potential) customers, generate leads, increase web traffic, and gather important data. As essential as these marketing efforts are, many email campaigns are a miss. This article will provide you with a step-by-step guide to making any email marketing campaign a hit.

Write great subject lines. David Ogilvy once said that 80 cents of your dollar should be spent on writing headlines. With emails, the subject line is just as important. If it doesn’t catch your attention, you won’t open it. So, spend the majority of your time writing and polishing your subject line. A great email subject line entices curiosity about the content of the email. It’s also personal, and highly relevant to the recipient. To learn more about how to write amazing subject lines, we have an entire blog post on the topic: 30 Successful Bloggers Share Their Best Converting Email Subject Line.
No matter how effective the subject line you’ll always have subscribers who don’t open it for a variety of reasons. Send your email again specifically targeting a list segment of those who didn’t open the first time around. Not only is this a second chance in case they just missed the first email, it’s another opportunity to further split test subject lines as well as send times.
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