But while automations are designed to take some of the work and effort out of engaging with your customers, your emails should show that you care. You should take time to research what your customers like to help make your emails sound human and personal. Above all, marketing automation is an opportunity to deepen your relationship with your customers.


I recently had my MailChimp account suspended. One of my sites is in the ‘make money online’ space. It’s a completely legitimate website, but apparently if your emails contain keywords they don’t like, they will suspend you. I would not recommend using them. Contacting support I just get form responses that are completely unhelpful. There’s no phone support- just account termination. Really bad experience. Luckily, this is a very new site- but imagine if you have thousands of emails and they just shut you down without ANY recourse.
For instance, I like getting the New York Times cooking recipes. My partner Steve enjoys getting updates on the latest shows added to Netflix. I would never want an email from Netflix telling me anything, instant unsubscribe! Does this mean Netflix doesn’t benefit from its email marketing? Of course not. I am not someone who enjoys their emails so their email content isn’t really for me. It also doesn't affect my use or enjoyment of their service so let’s dispel the fear that if someone doesn’t enjoy your email content they will not use your service. So whether you prefer Seth Godin’s marketing emails or Marie Forleo’s weekly videos, the point is that marketing emails are all about what you have to offer that your ideal customers want and need. Not what everyone wants.

Consistent branding is fundamental to any good digital marketing strategy. You need to have a brand voice that represents your company’s values and culture. Once you’ve developed that identity, you need to keep it consistent across all of your marketing efforts.  That includes all of your email marketing campaigns. Consistent branding keeps your business recognizable to your audience. Plus, it builds trust, which is important for customer loyalty.


Promise privacy.[3] Many people will be reluctant to sign up for an email list unless you assure them you will keep their email addresses and personal information private. This should be promised upfront. Along with the initial promise, you should develop a privacy statement that will be included at the bottom of every email you send out. This statement should be brief and to the point.
Not only is InVision's newsletter a great mix of content, but I also love the nice balance between images and text, making it really easy to read and mobile-friendly -- which is especially important, because its newsletters are so long. (Below is just an excerpt, but you can read through the full email here.) We like the clever copy on the call-to-action (CTA) buttons, too.
When it comes to deciding how to craft that perfect subject line, there appears to be really only one area to avoid: the subject line of 60 to 70 characters. Marketers refer to this as the “dead zone” of subject length. According to research by Adestra, which tracked over 900 million emails for its report, there is no increase in either open rate or clickthroughs at this 60-to-70 character length of subject line.
Send people content they want. Email newsletter services offer features like groups and segmentation to help you make your content relevant to the people reading it. If you're sending different emails for different groups (for example, a nonprofit might send separate emails to volunteers, donors, and the board of directors), then you can ask people to check a box to join a particular group on your signup form. Segmentation allows you to target certain subscribers on your list without assigning them to group. If your store is having a sale, then you could send a campaign only to people near a particular zip code, because subscribers who live in other parts of the world don't need to know about it. You can also segment by activity, email clients, e-commerce data, and more. Sending relevant content will keep your readers engaged, and engaged readers look forward to your newsletter and share it with friends.
Affiliate networks also make it very easy to find products and services to promote. They will list advertisers by category and show which advertisers other publishers are currently having the most success with. Commission Junction, a large affiliate advertising network, currently has nearly 3,000 different advertisers listed. You will have the most success by promoting products that are closely related to the content that you write about. If you had a website about investing, you would primarily want to promote investing related services like stock brokerages and stock research tools. You wouldn’t get good results by promoting unrelated services like web hosting and domain name registration services.
Send Your Emails Without Testing: How do your emails look when your prospects or customers receive them? Does the design look the way it’s supposed to (on all screen sizes, assuming you’ve used a responsive design)? Is the sender correct? Do all the links work properly? Do you have any typos? These are all things you need to double check before sending your emails to prospects, and in order to do that you need to send test emails. Along the same lines, be sure to double, even triple, check your recipient list before hitting send. We all make mistakes, it’s inevitable, but if you have to send that apology email too often, it doesn’t look good.

Click through rates. Once your subscribers have opened your email, are they actually taking the action you need them to take? If you think that you have a low click through rate, perhaps your body copy is not as effective as it needs to be. Consider the following: Is the copy of your email relevant to the subject line? Did you offer real value to your subscribers in the email? Is your call-to-action clear enough? Is the link easy to find?
I think this email also makes quite a brilliant use of responsive design. The colors are bright, and it's not too hard to scroll and click -- notice the CTAs are large enough for me to hit with my thumbs. Also, the mobile email actually has features that make sense for recipients who are on their mobile device. Check out the CTA at the bottom of the email, for example: The "Open Stitcher Radio" button prompts the app to open on your phone.
Get familiar with the law – Laws on emailing people vary from one country to another so make sure that you are familiar with the legislation that governs electronic messages. For example, the CAN-SPAM act introduced in the US in 2003 dictates how businesses should follow certain protocols when sending emails to avoid prosecution. The FTC provides a good explanation of what it means for commercial email marketers, such as affiliates.
Make it shareable. Send content that people want to share, and make it easy for them to do it. Sure, subscribers can forward your campaign to friends, but that's a lot to ask. Include a public link to the web version of your campaign so people can read it outside of their email programs, and consider adding Twitter and Facebook links to your newsletter, so readers can share your content where they're already active. When their friends start sharing and subscribing, you'll know it's working.
Now that we’ve covered some of the bear bones of crafting a good email campaign, we’ve reached the point in this email marketing guide where it’s time to talk about visuals. While many claim to prefer emails with fancy visual elements, it’s often noted that emails without them actually convert best. While we neither suggest totally ignoring this element when building your email marketing strategy nor obsessing over the aesthetics, it’s best to find a balance between the two extremes. Make sure your CTA buttons are text based so that someone who can’t see the images can still understand the email, and of course you want to prioritize things like readability and mobile friendliness. Here are a few more technical guidelines to consider when coming up with the appearance of your emails:

Firstly, regarding your own benefits, an affiliate email marketing program or virtually any affiliate program should have the potential to generate a stable, or even growing, income stream for you. Even if it is a side income, it should ideally be a decent amount of money that will add to your monthly cash flow and make this venture worth your while.
Make Content an Afterthought: When you’re executing an email campaign, it’s common (and a best practice) to dedicate a lot of your focus on planning your campaign, segmenting your list and building out the emails. Very often, particularly in nurture campaigns and newsletters, content is a critical component of your emails. As a result, you also need to pay attention to the content that you’ll share in these emails. Strategically mapping your content to your email marketing efforts (and even aligning content creation with campaign planning efforts) is critical to your overall success. If your content is simply an afterthought, it shows.
Honestly, when I say “be real” – I mean it.  Don’t be afraid to talk about your failures with people (on your list).  They want to know that you weren’t BORN rich, or one of those naturally fit people that was just made to be a fitness model.  They want to hear your story, they want to hear your struggles, they went to know that you were in the SAME PLACE AS THEY ARE RIGHT NOW, DAMMIT!
When choosing images for your email marketing campaigns, consider those that represent concepts or interpretations of the topics included in your email marketing campaign. Look for simple, but bold images that draw attention but aren’t too distracting for your recipient. It may take a little longer than expected, but spending extra time on image selection helps your email campaign pop!

Subject line. What does better for you, emails with lots of information in the subject line or those with just a bit? If you have 200 addresses or more on your email list, A/B split testing can help you analyze two different subject lines for the exact same post to see which one gets a better response. There may be specific subject lines for your list that you’d like to test as well.
Let’s face it – most email newsletters are crap. Far too many companies see email newsletters as another way to push sales, even though many people who sign up for a newsletter are not looking to actively make a purchase. This can result in low sign-up volumes, high rates of subscriber abandonment, and “newsletters” that are light on news and heavy on pushy sales tactics.
Knowing your Email Marketing goal is the first step to run a successful Email Marketing Campaign, as this will guide you to understand the type of campaigns you should opt for, who your target audiences should be, what type of content you should include and the best ways through which you can gauge the performance of your Email Marketing Campaign. The most important thing about your Email Marketing goals is to let it stay aligned with the KPI and wider marketing goals of your company.
Make it scannable. Your subscribers are busy people who get a lot of email, so it's safe to assume you don't have their undivided attention. Instead of one long block, break up your content into short paragraphs. Include subheadings and images to guide readers through your email and make it easier to scan, and add a teaser to the top of your newsletter to tell subscribers what's in store. If you're sending a long article, consider inserting a "read more" link so people can get to the rest when it's convenient for them. Your subject line should be to-the-point and easy to digest, too. You might even want to a/b test subject lines to see which ones perform best.
Make it scannable. Your subscribers are busy people who get a lot of email, so it's safe to assume you don't have their undivided attention. Instead of one long block, break up your content into short paragraphs. Include subheadings and images to guide readers through your email and make it easier to scan, and add a teaser to the top of your newsletter to tell subscribers what's in store. If you're sending a long article, consider inserting a "read more" link so people can get to the rest when it's convenient for them. Your subject line should be to-the-point and easy to digest, too. You might even want to a/b test subject lines to see which ones perform best.
Email design matters in any successful email marketing campaign. If your emails look terrible, that reflects badly on you, and can make people stop reading. With more people than ever reading emails on mobile devices, it’s important to use a responsive email template so your email resizes automatically whether people are reading it on a phone, tablet, or desktop.
The solution is to send email campaigns from your own domain, e.g. @myshop.com. This will clearly communicate who you are to subscribers as well as spam and DMARC authentication filters. It’ll also make your ecommerce business look more professional to customers and reassure them that you’re running a legitimate business. Learn how to create professional email addresses for Shopify retailers. It’s an essential step towards fully understanding how email marketing works
I recently had my MailChimp account suspended. One of my sites is in the ‘make money online’ space. It’s a completely legitimate website, but apparently if your emails contain keywords they don’t like, they will suspend you. I would not recommend using them. Contacting support I just get form responses that are completely unhelpful. There’s no phone support- just account termination. Really bad experience. Luckily, this is a very new site- but imagine if you have thousands of emails and they just shut you down without ANY recourse.
There's a fine line between sending email message to your customers so often they're tempted to unsubscribe, and sending them so infrequently they forget who you are. A weekly newsletter is usually sufficient, and because it contains more than one item, you can communicate everything you need to in one email. Write a subject line that highlights something special in your newsletter and makes people want to read it, such as news of a sale. If you have a very special promotion or event coming up, send a separate email but limit those to once or twice a month.

Not only was this initial email great, but his response to my answers was even better: Within a few days of responding to the questionnaire, I received a long and detailed personal email from Matt thanking me for filling out the questionnaire and offering a ton of helpful advice and links to resources specifically catered to my answers. I was very impressed by his business acumen, communication skills, and obvious dedication to his readers.


Mobile readiness:  In 2016, 55% of all emails were opened on mobile devices, so a responsive, mobile friendly email format is crucial for your email marketing campaigns. Using responsive email templates that adapt to the subscriber’s screen size will ensure that your subscribers will see exactly what you want them to see. When you’re looking for email marketing tools for your business, pay attention to the usability, interactivity, and formatting the email service providers are able to offer in their email templates.
3. Email converts better. People who buy products marketed through email spend 138% more than those who do not receive email offers. In fact, email marketing has an ROI of 3800%. That’s huge! And if you are wondering if social media converts even better, think again: the average order value of an email is at least three times higher than that of social media.
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