A significant element of email marketing is relationship. Does a recipient trust you? Does a recipient even know who you are? When an email jumps the gun by forcing familiarity too soon, the personalization comes across as skeevy. Intimacy is earned in real life, and it would appear to be the same way with email. Take this example from my inbox; no one has called me lowercase kevan l lee in years.

Seriously, the most valuable advice given to me as an affiliate marketer – and that is being moved forward to you today – is to respect your audience at all times. They are making you part of their lives and are prepared to put money into your pocket. In exchange, it is your duty to give them meaningful content that addresses their wants and needs and follow up with affiliate offers that meet these objectives. Do this and you'll have all the success as an affiliate marketer you've ever dreamed of.

Consistent branding is fundamental to any good digital marketing strategy. You need to have a brand voice that represents your company’s values and culture. Once you’ve developed that identity, you need to keep it consistent across all of your marketing efforts.  That includes all of your email marketing campaigns. Consistent branding keeps your business recognizable to your audience. Plus, it builds trust, which is important for customer loyalty.

Newsletters have historically been emails that humble-brag about internal company achievements and give generic information to the poor saps that were unfortunate enough to end up on said company's RSS feed (whatever that is, or rather, was). So while the old “newsletter” content is useless and dead,  successful marketers know that quality email marketing is still one of the best marketing tools available, especially for service-based businesses. Depending on which study you read, you get $35 to $40 back for every dollar you invest in email! This reinforces the fact that, hands down, there's nothing more valuable than direct access to someone’s attention.
There are multiple ways you can capture attention with lead nurturing. It often involves a skillful blend of useful information and some sort of product offer. For example, you could offer your expertise free of charge to solve a prospect’s or customer’s problem, via a regular email newsletter. Or offer something special, like a “flash sale.” Or promise something exclusive, like “pre-launch” access to a new product or service.

For non automated emails and newsletters, you should always resend the same message to everyone who didn't open and or click your last email. This isn't always accurate, because email open tracking doesn't work if someone has images disabled. But doing this usually gets you an extra 20-30% boost.  I usually test out a totally new subject line on the resends. You can also rewrite part of the email with a different angle.

I recently had my MailChimp account suspended. One of my sites is in the ‘make money online’ space. It’s a completely legitimate website, but apparently if your emails contain keywords they don’t like, they will suspend you. I would not recommend using them. Contacting support I just get form responses that are completely unhelpful. There’s no phone support- just account termination. Really bad experience. Luckily, this is a very new site- but imagine if you have thousands of emails and they just shut you down without ANY recourse.


Email truth: people who opted in to receive your email two years, two months, or even two weeks ago, may not be interested in receiving your email anymore. Monitor your engagement metrics on a regular basis and remove unengaged users to help maintain good deliverability. (Hint: Check out R for re-engagement campaigns—they are one of the most effective tools to use to keep your list clean).
Beyond that, avoid using all caps, too many exclamation marks, and hyperbolic phrases ("ACT NOW BEFORE TIME RUNS OUT!!!!"). Poorly formatted HTML in your emails can also hurt how they’re handled. Every spam filter is different, so an email might pass through one filter but get flagged by another. For more comprehensive info on how spam filters work and how to avoid them, check out this guide by MailChimp.
Now that we’ve covered some of the bear bones of crafting a good email campaign, we’ve reached the point in this email marketing guide where it’s time to talk about visuals. While many claim to prefer emails with fancy visual elements, it’s often noted that emails without them actually convert best. While we neither suggest totally ignoring this element when building your email marketing strategy nor obsessing over the aesthetics, it’s best to find a balance between the two extremes. Make sure your CTA buttons are text based so that someone who can’t see the images can still understand the email, and of course you want to prioritize things like readability and mobile friendliness. Here are a few more technical guidelines to consider when coming up with the appearance of your emails:
Kick off with a fantastic subject line – Some people have to deal with so many emails that they often make a decision on whether to read an email based on the subject line – so think of it as your one shot at glory. Give them a great reason to read your email, such as “1-day 50% off sale” or “5 reasons why your dog doesn’t listen to you.” The better you know your audience, the more effective your subject lines will be.
Promise privacy.[3] Many people will be reluctant to sign up for an email list unless you assure them you will keep their email addresses and personal information private. This should be promised upfront. Along with the initial promise, you should develop a privacy statement that will be included at the bottom of every email you send out. This statement should be brief and to the point.

If you try too hard to emulate big companies, you could get in trouble. People may get annoyed with a high volume of emails. “Pay attention to your stats,” Bastian advises. “If subscribers drop off, look at your content. Are you sending the right information? Are you sending too often? Too many messages saying ‘Buy! Buy! Buy!’ can be really off-putting to people,” so make sure to intersperse useful messages with informational content in your email marketing.
Let’s face it – most email newsletters are crap. Far too many companies see email newsletters as another way to push sales, even though many people who sign up for a newsletter are not looking to actively make a purchase. This can result in low sign-up volumes, high rates of subscriber abandonment, and “newsletters” that are light on news and heavy on pushy sales tactics.
Edit. Even editors need editors. When you're working on your publishing calendar, leave plenty of time for the editing and revision process. Once you send a campaign, it goes straight to the inbox, and you can't go back and update it. Newsletters contain meaningful content, and sloppy ones reflect poorly on the companies who send them. Grammar and style are just as important for email as they are for websites and blogs.
Send a test email first.[16] Once you hit “send” on an email, there’s no going back. You can’t make corrections or change any of the content. Before you send an email out to your entire email list, send it to a few key people in your company. Have these people review the email content, confirm that all the links work, proofread the text, make sure the formatting looks right, etc.

The disadvantages of email marketing surround the rejection/spam rate of the emails by the consumers’ email program, negatively affecting the delivery rate of the emails. This has somewhat been eliminated with the idea of “Opt-in” emailing, where the consumer consents to receiving the emails and therefore eliminates the idea of receiving unsolicitated emails – Ideally maintaining emails that are relevant and appropriate to each individual recipient.


Ultimately, the goal of your email campaigns is to convert your email leads into buying customers. This means that your recipients need to open your email, and then they need to click on the call to action. You want to make this as easy as possible. Given that a majority of people are now using mobile devices to access the internet, make sure that your email templates are mobile optimized. This ensures that the images and text remain readable. They will also display proportionately. Mobile optimization is especially important for your call to action. If it doesn’t display correctly, then readers won’t click on it.
Another common mistake is to only send sales pitches to your readers.  “There’s more to sending out an email than putting some pictures of your product and saying, ‘okay, go buy it,’ because people won’t keep looking at the email if you don’t spend a little bit of time writing it,” says Bastian. Instead, post highly valuable content your readers are interested in and which they would benefit from, whether they use your product or not. Things like how-tos, tips and product help are popular types of content.[/two_third]
If you’re just getting started with email marketing, your list might be fairly small. That’s okay. Everyone starts somewhere, and you’ll grow your list over time. Just make sure you’re collecting email addresses, and especially that you have an opt-in form on your website, blog and applicable social networks so new people can sign up to join your list.
Whether you are an affiliate marketer, or do affiliate email marketing as a side-business to complement your income and your current services, it is in your best interest to find the highest-converting programs to promote. Essentially, market research requires your investing time, energy and effort in discovering what is a win-win solution both for your client and your reputation, as well as your income.

If you try too hard to emulate big companies, you could get in trouble. People may get annoyed with a high volume of emails. “Pay attention to your stats,” Bastian advises. “If subscribers drop off, look at your content. Are you sending the right information? Are you sending too often? Too many messages saying ‘Buy! Buy! Buy!’ can be really off-putting to people,” so make sure to intersperse useful messages with informational content in your email marketing.
If you’re going to get in the habit of pitching often, try to put yourself in the reader’s shoes. Ask yourself if your messaging is consistent with the expectations you’ve set. As I said before, Amazon does this well because they send relevant offers based on my buying habits. Those that send blind offers are far more likely to lose permission to keep doing so.
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