The key difference from an autoresponder is that workflows are smart: They can change the course of your automated series based on what your prospect will find useful. For instance, if a new subscriber receives a welcome email and the subsequent email is set up to send them an offer that they already found and downloaded on your site, the workflow tool will know and adapt. In an autoresponder, a user receives a specific set of emails at specific time intervals no matter what action they take.
Send people content they want. Email newsletter services offer features like groups and segmentation to help you make your content relevant to the people reading it. If you're sending different emails for different groups (for example, a nonprofit might send separate emails to volunteers, donors, and the board of directors), then you can ask people to check a box to join a particular group on your signup form. Segmentation allows you to target certain subscribers on your list without assigning them to group. If your store is having a sale, then you could send a campaign only to people near a particular zip code, because subscribers who live in other parts of the world don't need to know about it. You can also segment by activity, email clients, e-commerce data, and more. Sending relevant content will keep your readers engaged, and engaged readers look forward to your newsletter and share it with friends.
Now that you have a structured autoresponder sequence, your email marketing campaign is ready to hit the ground running. Over time, you’ll need to tweak small aspects of your campaign to ensure that it continues to provide the best return on investment (ROI) possible. We have a few tips that every affiliate marketer can use to boost their email marketing ROI. Below you’ll find a brief description of each tip.
Regarding spam, if your contact list consists of people who have subscribed to your newsletter, there’s nothing you need to worry about. Your subscribers have confirmed that they want to receive your emails, and that’s definitely not spam. If they do not want to receive your emails anymore, they can always unsubscribe. Email services make managing email lists much easier than attempting to do so on your own.
We just started using MailChimp because it seems to be the only one that offers a free account for small or new users. The problem is that there are so many steps for a potential subscriber to go through with both double opt-in and recaptcha, that we are getting at best complaints to worst, plain nasty comments posted on our Facebook page. We don’t know how many would be subscribers we lost because of this.
Provide interesting content. Avoid obvious sales pitches. Instead of immediately pitching your product, make the email about your readers. Instead of long-winded descriptions of your products and all the amazing services you provide, write about problems that might be afflicting your readers, then introduce solutions that include your products and services.[10]
Make it scannable. Your subscribers are busy people who get a lot of email, so it's safe to assume you don't have their undivided attention. Instead of one long block, break up your content into short paragraphs. Include subheadings and images to guide readers through your email and make it easier to scan, and add a teaser to the top of your newsletter to tell subscribers what's in store. If you're sending a long article, consider inserting a "read more" link so people can get to the rest when it's convenient for them. Your subject line should be to-the-point and easy to digest, too. You might even want to a/b test subject lines to see which ones perform best.
There are multiple ways you can capture attention with lead nurturing. It often involves a skillful blend of useful information and some sort of product offer. For example, you could offer your expertise free of charge to solve a prospect’s or customer’s problem, via a regular email newsletter. Or offer something special, like a “flash sale.” Or promise something exclusive, like “pre-launch” access to a new product or service.
Whatever form your newsletter takes, know it’s just one of many touchpoints. But it’s the most direct way to speak to the people who may be your clients someday consistently with no marginal cost. Focus on delivering value to them—even if there’s only 10 of them at first. For most service businesses just two or three new clients for the year is such a big payoff that nurturing a small list of interested subscribers thoughtfully is completely worth it. However, if you sell low cost products then quantity is important and building a huge list would be your goal.    
Track Metrics and Conduct A/B Testing: How well are you doing currently and what can you do to improve? Paying attention to the data from your previous email campaigns and testing hypotheses about improvements you can make via A/B testing can help answer these questions and take your efforts to the next level. In terms of metrics, be sure to monitor open rate, bounce rate, click through rate, unsubscribe rate and inbox placement rate. When it comes to A/B testing, common fields to test include subject line, image placement and design. In general, the more data you can capture and analyze, the more strategic you can be going forward.

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