I’d suggest starting with bi-weekly newsletter campaigns, in combination with other email campaigns where you send out emails based on special occasions, which could include Thanksgiving Day, Black Friday, July 4th, or Valentine’s Day. These campaigns usually work better than sending generic promotional emails periodically. People tend to spend their money at holidays, so use those days wisely, and plan your campaign in advance. Here’s a retail calendar for 2017; use it for your planning.
A lead magnet (a.k.a. an optin bribe) is something amazing that you give away for free in exchange for an email address. This doesn’t have to cost you anything to create– most lead magnets are digital materials like PDFs, MP3 audio files, or videos that you can create yourself at minimal or no cost. It can be absolutely anything you want, so long as it provides value for free.
Breaking up your sending volumes to a consistent level shows the ISPs it’s just business as usual (and you’re not a phisher or spammer). If you do end up sending high volumes of mail, make sure you build up your volume gradually (this can be done when warming up a new sending IP)—send too much mail at one time and you’re asking to be throttled by ISPs which can delay delivery time, frustrate your users, and likely cause a decrease in engagement.
If you’re going to get in the habit of pitching often, try to put yourself in the reader’s shoes. Ask yourself if your messaging is consistent with the expectations you’ve set. As I said before, Amazon does this well because they send relevant offers based on my buying habits. Those that send blind offers are far more likely to lose permission to keep doing so.

Loved reading this! Which of these would you recommend so that I could set myself reminders on certain clients so that I can follow up with them in the future? I feel like I am doing a lot of extra steps that I might not have to do if I was using an actual marketing software. I am in the very beginning stages of getting my business out there and I would like to follow up with potential clients down the road with an email… is this a possibility or should I just keep using my excel spreadsheet!?
Whatever form your newsletter takes, know it’s just one of many touchpoints. But it’s the most direct way to speak to the people who may be your clients someday consistently with no marginal cost. Focus on delivering value to them—even if there’s only 10 of them at first. For most service businesses just two or three new clients for the year is such a big payoff that nurturing a small list of interested subscribers thoughtfully is completely worth it. However, if you sell low cost products then quantity is important and building a huge list would be your goal.    
BuzzFeed – The popular news and entertainment website earns revenue by selling advertisements on their site, so the key objective of their marketing team is to drive more traffic. With that in mind, BuzzFeed sends regular email newsletters containing links to stories on their website with the goal of increasing the number of visits they get each month and increasing the amount of revenue they generate.
×