Whether your team holds monthly customer and prospect events, yearly conferences, or just occasional community outreach parties and events, it's important to have the best event marketing tool up your sleeve when the time comes to use it. After all, in-person events are some of the best ways to interact with potential customers and create a brand experience that prospects, customers, and your community will remember. 
Research shows that only 5% of customers who visit your site add items to their cart, so how can you reach the other 95%? Product retargeting emails can help—in fact, they generate 90x more orders per contact than regular bulk campaigns. These automated emails send to subscribers who view your items, but leave your site without adding anything to their cart. The most successful product retargeting emails test for the best time, include product recommendations, identify their audience, and speak to their goal. Still not sure how to make retargeting work for you? Check out a real-world example.
Spam filters. Email clients have spam filters in place. If you’re not careful your campaign may end up unable to reach its intended audience. Gmail is especially a difficult case; even opt-in subscription can end up in its promotions tab, away from the main inbox. Good email marketing software alerts you for potential spam triggers like: generic subject line; common exaggerated sales promises; complex layout and design; and too much URL links.
For many types of software—file sharing, projects, and content management or eCommerce especially—it often makes sense to self-host apps, customize them for your needs, and run them from your own server once your company's large enough. Not email. Sending emails from your own server simply is too much trouble for all but the largest companies. You'll likely see your emails blocked by spam filters, or your servers swamped when you send messages to a large list.
If you work off a list of more than 50-thousand subscribers and your online business runs into six figures or more, this probably is just what you're looking for. They meld shopping cart with email marketing strategy to facilitate schemes like segregating your buyers from subscribers, or setting up specific mailing sequences to particular people. You can do physical postcards as well. But they aren't cheap. Their setup fee is in the four figures. As you can guess, they are geared for successful companies that want to continue to boost the bottom line even further.

I’ve always been a mailchimp user myself, and I have to say I really like their UI but I’m always open to new options. I’ve dabbled in a couple of the other email marketing providers like Pure360 – but find them so clunky and annoying to use (despite them looking really pretty and having great templates) that I always end up going back to good old mailchimp. I haven’t used GetResponse yet, I’ll give their free trial a shot :)
Front. Front is a customer support solution with an email marketing component. It is a clear example how customer service can leverage email marketing to monetize tickets. As a ticketing system, it consolidates customer queries from multiple channels like your web form, email, social media pages and website. The tickets you receive can be turned into leads if they meet your required metrics. Font’s interface, in fact, is designed like an email client, from which you can launch email marketing campaigns targeting satisfied customers.
Hi. thank you for the great information. I currently have Mail Chimp and it is set up to sync between my WordPress site and Mail Chimp. the problem is it isn’t and new subscribers to my blog are not being updated onto the list on the Mail chimp end. I have tried several fixes and nothing is working. I am unsure what to do now after endless googling it may be time to quit Mail Chimp. Seems others are having this problem also.
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